CIR Test Needed On Samples Of Jon Jones

CIR-Test-Needed-On-Samples-Of-Jon-JonesUFC light-heavyweight champion Jon Jones may face more troubles after it was recently revealed that his Testosterone reading were unusual. Jones tested positive for cocaine in December before his title defence at UFC 182 with Daniel Cormier.

Jones was allowed to fight Cormier at UFC 182 despite his positive test for cocaine. The drug test of Jones revealed the presence of Benzoylecgonine, which is not a banned substance according to the World Anti-Doping Agency. UFC president Dana White said Jones was allowed to fight as he was not using a performance enhancing drug and had the "right to fight." White went on to say that we all praise Anderson Silva for being the greatest fighter of all time, and praise all these other people, but not many people can reach outside of the sport and outside of the world of mixed martial arts, and he believes that Jon is one of those people that can do that.

The testosterone levels of Jones were abnormally low on December 4th when Jones was tested twice (reading . 29 and .35 with a 'normal' testosterone reading of 1) and then even lower .19 two weeks after he was tested again. Many anti-doping experts believe the results of Jones are suspicious despite his levels under the legal limit of the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

Don Catlin, an anti-doping expert and former head of the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory, said it should be seen if Jones had taken Epitestosterone to lower his T/E ratio. Catlin said the T/E ratio is the resultant of a ratio of Testosterone over Epitestosterone, so if you have a large amount of testosterone in the urine, you get a high T/E ratio. He added if you have a lot of epitestosterone, you will get a high epitestosterone (level) and added that you can’t make a conclusion based on one value and you have to have both values.

Endocrinologist Jeffrey Brown, who runs a private practice in Houston, said the T/E ratio of Jones could not have become depressed because of excessive excretion. Catlin added a carbon isotope ratio (CIR) test is advised. This test is used for detecting the presence of Synthetic Testosterone in the body. Considered an expensive test, the CIR test is ordered only by the NSAC in the case of a challenged positive test.

Catlin went on to add that the T/E ratio such as that of Jones should be triggering additional tests for determining how he got there. The anti-doping expert remarked it is a urinary test for testosterone and you do not even need to measure free and total testosterone. Catlin commented that a carbon isotope test will show if something wrong has been done.

NSAC Executive Director Bob Bennett said the initial urine sample of Jones was "watery" and another test was requested by NSAC. The next sample delivered a testosterone count of .19.

Jones, who is presently in rehab, thrice had his Testosterone-to-epitestosterone ratio measured as part of an out-of-competition test ordered by the Nevada State Athletic Commission. The Testosterone-to-epitestosterone ratio is used for tipping off potential use of performance enhancing drugs.

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