Armstrong Case ‘Done And Dusted,’ Says Fahey

Armstrong Case 'Done And Dusted,' Says FaheyJohn Fahey, the outgoing president of the World Anti-Doping Agency, has remarked disgraced former cyclist Lance Armstrong needs something close to a miracle for his lifetime suspension to be lifted.

Armstrong was banned for life and stripped of his seven Tour de France titles for taking banned substances. After years of denials, Lance finally admitted on the Oprah Winfrey talkshow that he used banned drugs and techniques like blood doping, blood transfusions, human growth hormone, cortisone, testosterone, and EPO to stay ahead of the rest. Armstrong admitted that he made those decisions and they were his mistakes. He added that he did not feel he was cheating at the time and viewed it as a "level playing field" and said he was a bully who "turned on" people he did not like. The cyclist added that he sees anger and betrayal in the eyes of people who believed in him and supported him and they have every right to feel betrayed and it's his fault and he'll spend the rest of my life trying to earn back trust and apologizes to people.

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) had accused Armstrong of conducting the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program sport has ever seen. The cyclist has now remarked that he is open to cooperating with any doping inquiry but said he wants to be treated the same as other drug cheats.

WADA chief John Fahey said it's done and dusted as far as he is concerned. The WADA head remarked only USADA can reopen the case of Armstrong and there would have to be an enormously powerful reason for it to do so. Fahey said Armstrong did what he did, he did not co-operate, did not defend the charges. The Australian said Armstrong was dealt with by proper process and the reasoned decision released by USADA was irrefutable and it would take something close to a miracle to see it change in his case.

A few weeks back, Armstrong handed back the bronze medal he won in the road time trial at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. The cyclist remarked he had paid a high price in terms of my standing within the sport, his reputation, certainly financially because the lawsuits have continued to pile up. Armstrong added he had experienced massive personal loss, massive loss of wealth, while others have truly capitalized on this story and said he would do whatever he could to close the chapter and move things forward, conceding he did not have a whole lot of credibility but also insisting he had nothing to lose.

In another development, Brian Cookson, the new International Cycling Union president, said it would be helpful if Lance Armstrong was able to give evidence to it but it’s not absolutely essential. He added we know pretty much all of what Lance Armstrong was involved in and the areas where there is more to know about is around the other people involved in those activities at that time and that would be interesting to find out. Cookson added he is talking more about the doctors, the coaches, and the facilitators and so on but, above all, he thinks the most important thing is the allegations that have been made about cover-ups and collusion at the UCI in the past.


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