FDA Warns Of Liver Injury From Muscle-Building Supplement

The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning to customers to avoid dietary supplements sold by a Las Vegas company as they may contain anabolic steroids that can cause liver damage.

FDA Warns Of Liver Injury From Muscle-Building Supplement

The FDA disclosed that it is presently investigating Tri-Methyl Xtreme supplements after three injuries were reported from users in California, New Jersey, and Utah. In a statement, the US FDA remarked the capsules are distributed by Extreme Products Group of Las Vegas and it is claimed that they contain anabolic steroids. These products are sold by some retailers and gyms and can be purchased online. The FDA warned consumers who have taken the supplements to watch out for potential signs of adverse effects, including discolored urine, unexplained fatigue, abdominal or back pain.

Dr. Charles Lee, a senior scientist with the FDA, in a statement, said anabolic steroids may have a range of serious adverse effects on many organ systems, and the damage may be irreversible.

In March, an Arizona nutritional supplement company known as Athletic Xtreme filed a lawsuit against Extreme Performance Group and other supplement companies and claimed that they falsely advertise supplements containing synthetic steroids as all-natural products. Athletic Xtreme claimed the prohormone nutritional supplements and “Turnt Up” preworkout supplement of EPG contain illegal steroids that have been banned by the federal government.

Last year, a study appearing in the journal Pediatrics revealed that gay and bisexual teenage boys in the United States tend to use illegal steroids at a rate which is almost six times higher than straight kids. It was disclosed by the researchers that reason for this surge among gay boys could be because they think muscle-building steroids will help them fend off bullies or they may feel more pressure to achieve a bulked-up “ideal” male physique.

Study co-author Aaron Blashill, a psychologist and scientist with the Fenway Institute, the research arm of a Boston health center that treats gays and lesbians, said it is a bit sad that we saw such a large health disparity and added it would given the dramatic disparity seem that this is a population in which greater attention is needed.

According to a new study, popular weight-loss and workout supplements on sale in hundreds of vitamin shops across the United States contain a chemical nearly identical to amphetamine. The chemical was described by Canadian health authorities in December as BMPEA [β-Methylphenethylamine (β-Me-PEA, BMPEA)]. The physiological effects of BMPEA are most likely very similar to those of DMAA, said Bastiaan Venhuis, a scientist who studies tainted supplements at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands. In 2011, the Department of Defense banned supplements containing DMAA from military bases after they were implicated in the deaths of two soldiers.

A few weeks back, the US Congress was urged by 14 state attorneys general, led by Eric T. Schneiderman of New York to provide more power to the US FDA to regulate supplements. In February, the office of Schneiderman accused four major retailers of selling contaminated herbal supplements, and one of the companies has agreed to extensive new testing and quality control procedures for its store-brand herbal products.


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