IOC Defends Rio 2016 Anti-Doping System

The International Olympic Committee claimed on Thursday that drug testing at the Rio Olympics was “better” than at London 2012 Olympics though it admitted keeping the process from collapsing had required “enormous hard work”.

1

Telegraph Sport had reported that organizational chaos engulfed the recently-concluded Olympics. The chaos spread to IOC's anti-doping operation amid no-shows and walkouts from volunteers and testers along with a series of security lapses, which was confirmed by the International Olympic Committee.

A senior figure in the war on drugs branded the system of sample collection as the “worst” ever at the Olympic Games. Insiders admitted that “very resourceful” Doping Control Officers from countries such as the United Kingdom had prevented the integrity of the process being compromised else the situation would surely have gone beyond control and irreparable damage.

IOC's director of communications, Mark Adams, said the figures in quantity are more or less the same as London and added but what is actually more important is our intelligence testing is much, much better and also said we are targeting people much, much better. Adams added it is of course important to have quantity, but what we have improved is quality and actual intelligence testing, which he thinks is very important.

Dr Richard Budgett, the IOC’s medical and scientific director, said in a statement that it is correct that there are fewer volunteers and chaperones than planned and added it reflects the situation across the Games. Budgett added the integrity and quality of the doping control program has been maintained for the protection of clean athletes thanks to the enormous hard work and dedication of the majority of both international and Brazilian volunteer chaperones, and the Brazilian and international Doping Control Officers.

Budgett added the first priority is to make sure the thousands of tests taken in Rio are transported safely and securely, taken up to IOC’s headquarters in Lausanne and stored there. The IOC’s medical and scientific director added science moves on and we have found from the London and Beijing samples that we can pick up substances we could not have detected earlier with new techniques.

In another development, the first Olympic medal at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics has been stripped. Kyrgyzstan weightlifter Izzat Artykov was stripped of his bronze medal in men’s weightlifting after he tested positive for strychnine, per Olympics Journalists’ Association president Steve Wilson.

Artykov will not be allowed to keep his bronze after lifting 339 kilograms (747.367 pounds) and Colombian Luis Javier Mosquera Lozano, who finished fourth with a lift of 338 kilograms, is in line to receive the bronze medal in Rio’s 69-kilogram weightlifting event.

A potent stimulator, Strychnine is best known as a highly poisonous substance capable of sending humans into convulsions, asphyxia, and eventually death in doses of 30-100 milligrams. It was added to the WADA list of banned substances. The highly toxic drug often used as a pesticide, particularly for killing rodents, has been long associated with sports doping and is generally used in small doses to tighten tired muscles.

Tags:

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.