Lance Armstrong To Appeal Against Doping Perjury Lawsuit

In perhaps one of the largest perjury sanctions against an individual in American judicial history, former Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong has been ordered to pay $10 million in fraud arbitration. The former American professional road racing cyclist was ordered by the arbitrators to pay $10 million after they called the case “an unparalleled pageant of international perjury, fraud and conspiracy”.

Lance Armstrong

A three-person panel said Armstrong, who won seven consecutive Tour de France titles before admitting to use of banned drugs, owes $10 million to SCA Promotions of Dallas for lying under oath about not using performance enhancing drugs. In a 2-1 ruling, the arbitrators said the disgraced cyclist used perjury and other wrongful conduct to secure millions of dollars of benefits. The arbitrators went on to remark that it was disturbing for them to learn that Lance Armstrong "expressed no remorse" about this lies and still continued to lie under oath at the arbitration.

Lance's attorney, Tim Herman, said his client will appeal the decision. Herman remarked a 2006 contract between Lance Armstrong and SCA Promotions was "final and binding." In a statement, Herman said this award is unprecedented and added that no court or arbitrator has ever reopened a matter which was fully and finally settled voluntarily. He went on to remark that SCA in this matter repeatedly affirmed that it never relied upon anything Armstrong said or did in deciding to settle in 2006. The arbitration ironically began in 2004 when the former cyclist sued SCA Promotions for breach of contract. Armstrong alleged that SCA Promotions did not pay his bonuses for winning the Tour de France while SCA claimed that Armstrong used banned drugs to win the Tour de France. In the 2006 arbitration, SCA was ordered to pay him $7.5 million to Armstrong as it was unable to prove that the ex-cyclist had used performance enhancing drugs.

SCA Promotions decided to appeal against the 2006 verdict after the United States Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong of all his Tour de France titles and banned him for life. In January 2013, Armstrong admitted to doping during much of his cycling career and SCA sued him to get its money back. In 2013, Lance Armstrong admitted in a televised interview that he started taking performance-enhancing drugs in the mid-1990s. During the Oprah Winfrey interview, he admitted to using testosterone, EPO, and blood transfusions. Recently, Armstrong said he would be continued lying about his doping practices if he had not gotten caught.

Lance Armstrong, who was diagnosed with stage four testicular cancer in 1996, to win his seven Tour de France titles, which he won from 1999 to 2005. Armstrong began competing as a triathlete at the age of 16 and was the national sprint-course triathlon champion in 1989 and 1990. The former American professional road racing cyclist started his career as a professional cyclist with the Motorola team and won the World Championship in 1993, Clásica de San Sebastián in 1995 and Tour DuPont in 1995 and 1996.


Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.