Oakley Turned A Blind Eye To Armstrong’s Doping

Sunday Times journalist David Walsh has claimed that sports brand Oakley continued to sponsor Lance Armstrong for years even after its CEO found out that Armstrong was a drug cheat. The company continued its sponsorship of Armstrong until October 2012 and not before the UCI, the cycling's world governing body, confirmed that Lance Armstrong would be banned for life from competing as a cyclist.lance armstrong

In the ABC documentary Stop at Nothing: the Lance Armstrong Story, Walsh remarked Stephanie McIlvain, who was a close friend of Armstrong and was employed as the cyclist's representative by Oakley, revealed to him that Oakley chief executive officer and founder Jim Jannard knew about the doping practices of Lance Armstrong. Walsh said McIlvain had conversations with Jim Jannard that discussed Lance's doping and stories that Jim had heard from Lance, concerning Lance's doping.

           This documentary is directed by Alex Holmes and produced by Quentin McDermott and Jessica Ludgrove.

Betsy Andreu, who was a close friend of Mrs. McIlvain, confirmed that Stephanie McIlvain told her many times that Jim knew about the doping practices of Armstrong. McIlvain, in a private telephone conversation (taped without her knowledge) with Greg LeMond, three-time winner of the Tour de France, said she already told Jim Jannard what was going on and s he told him she won't lie. In 2005, McIlvain was accused of lying under oath when she provided sworn evidence in a deposition when questioned about Lance Armstrong and the cyclist's doping. McIlvain denied she overheard Armstrong admitting to the doctors in a hospital that he had taken performance enhancing drugs.

In the taped conversation with LeMond, Mrs. McIlvain remarked she did overheard Armstrong saying it. Jeff Tillotson, the Dallas attorney who questioned Mrs. McIlvain and Lance Armstrong during their depositions, said to the documentary makers that this recording was done well before the deposition so all we could conclude from that was someone got to her because she clearly changed her testimony. Mrs. McIlvain may now be called to provide a sworn deposition in a federal "whistleblower" lawsuit that has been brought by Floyd Landis and the US Department of Justice against Lance Armstrong. In another development, a spokesperson for Oakley remarked the company is focusing its energies on today’s athletes who compete cleanly, fairly, and honestly.

In 2004, a book L.A. Confidentiel – Les secrets de Lance Armstrong revealed allegations from Emma O'Reilly, Armstrong's former soigneur, that a backdated prescription for cortisone was produced before the UCI for avoiding a positive test. O'Reilly claimed one of the team doctors issue a pre-dated prescription for an ointment to combat saddle sores.

In January 2013, the American former professional road racing cyclist admitted to doping in a television interview conducted by Oprah Winfrey. This was after the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) accused Armstrong of using and encouraging the use of banned drugs such as Testosterone, EPO, and Cortisone. USADA stripped Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles that he won between 1999 and 2005. Armstrong decided not to appeal the decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.


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