Sports Doping Should Be Made Criminal Offence, Says Hurdler

Hurdler Thomas Barr has remarked that athletes who dope essentially steal from clean athletes. Barr also remarked doping in sports should be made a criminal offence.

Thomas Barr

The Irish athlete, who is presently ranked the 10th fastest in the 400m hurdles, said he is alarmed at the extent of the latest doping allegations that were brought up by the Sunday Times and German broadcaster ARD. Barr went on to comment that no one can say that the sport will be entirely clean and added he doubts if sports was ever clean.

The hurdler from Ireland said there will always be that slight element of doubt over different things and added that it is completely unfair when athletes end up getting medals five or six years later as the athletes who finished ahead of them eventually were caught doping. Barr said athletes who dope steal the whole medal ceremony and said clean athletes suffer a lot because of dopers as there is such a huge difference between winning a major championship medal and not winning, especially with endorsements and sponsorships.

Thomas Barr said doping in sports should be made a criminal offence by all countries, including Ireland. Barr said it could be something that might actually work.

Doping in sports is a criminal offence in many countries such as Italy, France, and Australia. These countries have criminalized the use of banned substances under the World Anti-Doping Code. Earlier this year, Germany drafted a legislation that could possibly put doping athletes behind jail bars if they are found guilty of using performance enhancing drugs.

In another development, Lord Moynihan, the former sports minister and former chairman of the British Olympic Association, has called on the British government to make emulate countries like France and Australia by criminalizing the use of prohibited substances under the World Anti-Doping Code.

Lord Moynihan branded contents of a documentary by German broadcaster ARD that highlighted the extent of drug-taking in endurance disciplines as “horrifying”. Lord Moynihan remarked the confidentiality of testing of course is a very important issue that needs to be dealt with and added but dealing with that should not mask the crisis besetting athletics and the need for the World Anti-Doping Agency – which is 50 per cent governments and 50 per cent International Olympic Committee – to take action.

Richard Caborn, who helped draw up the original World Anti-Doping Code in 2003, said it was absolutely wrong for the world athletics body of governing to go after the whistle-blower who leaked the IAAF confidential data. Richard added somebody has had the guts to release this information and that is absolutely right. He also questioned why the athletics' governing body had not previously shared its data on suspicious blood values with the World Anti-Doping Agency. Richard Caborn added the fact that the IAAF did not use the World Anti-Doping Agency to check over this, that is where it is fundamentally wrong and this is the reason why we established the World Anti-Doping Agency, for governing bodies to be able to go to them with any suspicious circumstances and let them do a professional evaluation.

Tags:

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.