Stolen Biogenesis Documents Were Purchased By MLB

A new police report has revealed that Major League Baseball repeatedly ignored warnings from Florida investigators that records they sought in the Biogenesis case against baseball star Alex Rodriguez were stolen and they should not purchase them.

New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez

It is believed that a copy of Biogenesis documents were stolen from the car of a former Biogenesis employee who had refused to sell them to the Major League Baseball but promised to turn them over to the Florida Department of Health.

According to the April police report, Detective Terrence Payne warned MLB investigators that Biogenesis documents had been stolen before Major League Baseball made the purchase, which was vehemently denied by MLB spokesperson Pat Courtney. The report written by Detective Terrence Payne said there is not enough probable cause at this time to charge anyone else with a criminal act although there is evidence of involvement by Peter Carbone, Anthony Carbone, Gary Jones, and several MLB investigators.

According to a statement by the spokesperson, MLB has stated repeatedly that we had no knowledge that the documents we purchased were stolen. It was recently reported by the Miami New Times that five members of its investigative team, including Ed Dominguez, who was named specifically by police as being told not to buy Biogenesis records, were fired by MLB.

The MLB used this evidence to fight its case against New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez accusing him of using banned performance enhancing drugs including anabolic androgenic steroids.

After a long initial resistance, Rodriguez abandoned his fight against Major League Baseball and dropped his lawsuit for tortious interference in U.S. District Court in Manhattan. The baseball player also withdrew lawsuits against Commissioner Bud Selig and the Major League Baseball Players Association. This brought an end to his battle for overturning an unprecedented 211-game suspension that was reduced to 162 games plus the 2014 playoffs by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz.

Rodriguez was already losing $25 million in salary during his suspension and his continued battle against the MLB and MLBPA could have cost him around $10 million more in legal fees to continue his fight to play baseball in 2014. It is also believed that Alex Rodriguez was trying to reconcile with the governing world body of baseball to continue to work in the industry once his playing days are finished. Alex may have been encouraged to made this decision to drop his lawsuit fearing that he may be ostracized from the game the way Pete Rose, baseball's all-time hits leader, has been since he gambled on baseball while a manager.

In a statement after Rodriguez dropped the lawsuit, the MLB had remarked that we have been informed that Alex Rodriguez has reached the prudent decision to end all of the litigation related to the Biogenesis matter. It was added that the MLB believe that Rodriguez's actions show his desire to return the focus to the play of our great game on the field and to all of the positive attributes and actions of his fellow major league players and we share that desire. The MLBPA said in a statement that Alex Rodriguez has done the right thing by withdrawing his lawsuit and his decision to move forward is in everyone's best interest.


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