Teams Call On ASADA

Australian Football LeagueThe Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority has been called by Geelong, Melbourne, Adelaide, and Greater Western Sydney over doping concerns.

According to the Sunday Mail, Australian Football League sources have been corresponding with the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority. Geelong, Greater Western Sydney, and Adelaide all contacted ASADA over concerns about prohibited substances before the 2013 season kicked off. Melbourne also called the anti-doping agency of Australia over concerns about prohibited substances before the 2013 season kicked off. However, ASADA has not revealed what is bothering these clubs and has not released details of their correspondence.

Three partial documents were released by ASADA recently to Herald Sun, despite initially identification of 2444 relevant documents and a $16,619.40 price tag on vetting them. Two of these partially-released Herald Sun, despite initially identifying 2444 relevant documents and putting a $16,619.40 price tag on vetting them while the third was an email from the Adelaide Crows seeking a list of prohibited substances.

ASADA spokesman Rohan Lindeman refused to divulge information about the number of whistleblowers ASADA has in the ranks of the Australian Football League and didn't provided any indication of the type of doping concerns raised by the clubs. He remarked ASADA does not discuss the operational details of its anti-doping program.

In another development, the Australian Football League has made changes to its anti-doping code after finding players from nine clubs have used independently sourced supplements. Earlier this year, an AFL survey, carried out under the guidance of its chief medical officer Peter Harcourt disclosed the information in addition to finding 12 clubs were conducting supplement programs. These supplement programs, according to the survey, lacked a single point of accountability with the unnamed clubs not properly documenting the supplements used by players.

The changes to the AFL's anti-doping code include cataloguing the prohibited and controlled treatments of the league, a list of which will be completed before the start of next season. Under the new list, prohibited treatments, alongside those listed by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), cannot be used by players and controlled treatments must require written approval from club doctors and controlled prohibited treatments, alongside those listed by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), cannot be used by players and controlled treatments must require written approval from club doctors. Via its website, the AFL stated its anti-doping code will go "above and beyond the WADA code."

The Australian Football League will also be considering prohibiting certain providers of treatments, as a way of ensuring safe practice and eliminating the threat of organized crime becoming involved in the game and medical officers of the club, under what the AFL has described as a "no-needles policy", will only be allowed to inject players when required for treatment purposes.

This year, ASADA investigated Geelong, Gold Coast, and Brisbane while a probe into Melbourne is ongoing while Essendon remains under investigation by the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority. Meanwhile, NRL and AFL teams can take some relief from the fact that ASADA bans would not affect World Cup.

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