Threat To Sport From “Woefully Inadequate” Governance, Says UK Anti-Doping Head

In his last performance report as chair of UK Anti-Doping (UKAD), David Kenworthy has delivered a strongly-worded warning about the consequences for sport of sub-standard governance.

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Kenworthy observed in his performance report that the past year had seen “the best times and the worst times in anti-doping”. The UKAD chair, whose four-year contract expires in February 2017, said finding the odd flawed athlete is the norm but it is said to learn that whole systems are corrupt and that governance of sport is woefully inadequate and also possibly corrupt threatens the wholesome face of all sport.

Kenworthy added UK Anti-Doping since its inception in 2009 has led the fight against doping and is at the forefront of protecting clean sport and commented that all its efforts have been directed at weeding out the cheats, whether they be athletes or support staff and ensuring that they receive their just desserts.

The chair of UK Anti-Doping said it is hard to make out whether the effort has been worthwhile after reading the findings of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Independent Commission. Kenworthy said the foundations of trust that guide anti-doping organizations have been seriously undermined and also commented that clean athletes must rightly question whether any competition is, or has been, fair.

In the recent times, UK Anti-Doping has come under fire itself after being strongly criticized about its failures to alert the General Medical Council (GMC) about allegations that a Harley Street doctor had assisted sportspeople take performance enhancing drugs.

Kenworthy noted in his report that UKAD Nicole Sapstead has successfully endured a baptism of fire with the support of a very capable team of directors that was reduced in size to allow smarter working and to reduce overheads.

The latest annual report of UKAD also revealed it is in dispute with Government over occupancy costs at its Fleetbank House base. It was stated in the report that a disagreement has arisen concerning the level of occupancy costs following the transfer of Fleetbank House from the Office of Fair Trading to the Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS). The latest annual report, covering the 12 months to March 31, further noted UKAD is seeking to resolve this matter and depending on the outcome of the dispute, some or all of this approximately £160,000 ($211,000/€191,000) may become payable as the agent acting for BIS sought £302,000 ($398,000/€361,000) for the year ended 31 March 2015 against the £221,000 ($291,000/€264,000) which was considered due and recognized in the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure.

The annual report of UKAD also noted a similar difference will have arisen for the year ended 31 March 2016 but no request was made by the agent acting for BIS. The report also confirmed that UK Anti-Doping has been advised that financing will be reduced in 2016/17. The contribution was £490,000 ($646,000/$485,000) in 2015-16 and the government from 2016-2017 will no longer be paying UKAD additional grant-in-aid to cover the contribution of United Kingdom to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

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