Tyson Gay’s Former Coach Sues Over Doping Case

Olympic gold medalist Jon Drummond, who coached Tyson Gay as recently as 2012, is suing the American sprinter and the United States Anti-Doping Agency for accusing him falsely of administering and providing performance enhancing drugs to Gay.

Tyson Gay

In his defamation lawsuit, Drummond claimed false statements made by Tyson Gay to USADA had injured his reputation as an honest track and field coach and athlete. Drummond filed a lawsuit against Gay and USADA CEO Travis Tygart in a Texas county civil court.

Drummond remarked that he was notified by USADA a month ago that it intended to seek a lifetime ban against him. In 2013, Gay tested positive thrice for an exogenous androgenic anabolic steroid and/or its metabolites.

The American athlete was given a reduced ban of one year for providing substantial assistance to the United States Anti-Doping Agency. "Substantial assistance" is defined under the World Anti-Doping Agency Code as full disclosure of all information an athlete possesses in relation to the doping violation and implicating other individuals. Sebastian Coe, vice-president of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), questioned the reduced ban of Gay and asked for details about the assistance provided by the American athlete.

It is interesting to note that Gay's positive drug tests came several months after Jon Drummond stopped working with him.

Last year, Drummond told Sports Illustrated that he stopped working with Tyson Gay since September 2012. Sports Illustrated revealed last year that Drummond knew Clayton Gibson, an anti-aging doctor, who started working with Gay before the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials, which ran from June 21-July 1, 2012.

According to the USADA report, Gay first made use of a product that contained a prohibited substance on July 15, 2012. USADA investigation revealed that Tyson Gay tested positive for a steroid or steroid precursor believed to have come from a cream given to him by Atlanta chiropractor and anti-aging specialist Clayton Gibson III. However, Drummond vehemently denied being aware of any creams that Tyson Gay was using that might have contained banned substances.

Gibson had remarked that Tyson Gay had been referred to him by former U.S. sprinter Jon Drummond that was denied by Drummond who remarked he met the doctor with Gay last year. Drummond remarked he did not recommend that Tyson enter a relationship with him, long-term or otherwise. It was alleged in the lawsuit that Gay received a shipment of the products from the chiropractor, valued at $9,000 (£5,000/€6,500) and it was "unequivocally" recommended by Drummond that Gay discard as he did not believe they were "safe and appropriate." The lawsuit says Drummond was absolutely stunned when rumors began to arise that either Gay himself or others intended to blame this positive test on Drummond.

The 45-year-old Drummond won Olympic silver and gold medals in 1996 and 2000 as part of the U.S. Olympic 4x100m relay teams. Mark Whitburn, one of Drummond's attorneys, said Drummond was a proponent for clean competition when he was an athlete and a coach and added Drummond categorically denies any wrongdoing.

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