UCI Should Act Fast And Tough On Motorized Doping, Says UEC

The European Cycling Union (UEC) has urged the world governing body of cycling to take quick, tough, and effective action after the first confirmed case of motorized doping surfaced.

Femke Van Den Driessche

In a statement, the UEC that is headed by UCI Vice President David Lappartient confirmed they would be developing an action plan that would later be submitted to the cycling's world governing body for consideration. The UEC statement reads the European Cycling Union urges the UCI to move quickly in the coming weeks and step up strict checks before and after races so that an end can be put to the growing climate of suspicion and the image of cycling can be preserved.

The UEC statement also added this event strikes a blow to the credibility of our sport, and reminds us that our organizations must be relentless in the fight against all types of fraud, whether chemical or technological and added we must be intransigent in the defense of our values. The statement went on to read that it goes without saying that the cyclist-in-question shall be called to a disciplinary hearing by the UCI and must answer for her actions and also added it is very important for determining how much fraud occurred and who the accomplices were.

In the statement, the UEC also added the UCI is consulting with legal counsel to see what action can be taken and against whom because the accused cyclist is a European champion, and given the considerable harm that this affair has caused to our sport in general and European cycling in particular. The UEC concluded their statement by saying it would show the UCI their own action plan to combat the problem and urged the cycling body to do more in their fight against motorized doping. The European Cycling Union said everything must be done to closely inspect bicycles and wheels now, more than ever, especially in an Olympic year, as the European Cycling Union first proposed on 20 July 2015.

It was recently confirmed by UCI inspectors during the Cyclo-cross World Championships in Zolder at the end of January that a motor was found in the bike of 19-year-old Femke Van den Driessche. The cyclist has vehemently denied that the bike with the motor belonged to her. Van den said the bike with motor belonged to Nico Van Muylder. The case is all set to be put in front of a disciplinary commission and Driessche and anyone else found guilty may receive a minimum ban of six months and a 20,000 Swiss Franc fine. Driessche, who races for the trade team Team Kleur op Maat and is sponsored by Wilier, claimed she sold the bike to him a year ago. Her brother Niels Van den Driessche is currently serving a suspension for doping after he tested positive for Erythropoietin (EPO).

This discovery by the UCI was the first of its kind since the governing body implemented bike checks in 2015. The UCI is yet to announce any kind of disciplinary action.


Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.