WADA Received 200 Emails From Whistleblower

In an interview that aired on the CBS news show Sunday night, a former worker at the Russian anti-doping agency revealed he sent 200 emails and 50 letters about the cheating to the World Anti-Doping Agency.


Vitaly Stepanov revealed WADA told him it did not have the authority to investigate inside the country. The whistleblower who uncovered systemic doping inside Russia's track team told 60 Minutes that 50 letters and 200 emails were sent by him to the World Anti-Doping Agency. Vitaly added WADA eventually steered he and his wife, 800-meter runner Yulia, to a German TV network that produced the doping documentary that preceded investigation from WADA.

Reacting to the claims, WADA spokesman Ben Nichols remarked WADA did not had authority before 2015 to conduct its own investigations. Nichols remarked WADA officials did not thought passing on the information over to Russian investigators would have led to the required scrutiny. The WADA spokesman added the World Anti-Doping Agency was primarily worried that passing on the information would put Vitaly and his wife, 800-meter runner Yulia, in danger. Nichols remarked we acted without hesitation by forming the independent commission that acted without hesitation by forming the independent commission that looked into the scandal.

Stepanov also told 60 Minutes that he is in touch with Grigory Rodchenkov, the former director of the Russian anti-doping lab, who told him a list of Russian athletes who made use of anabolic androgenic steroids at the Sochi Olympics including four gold-medal winners. In November, Rodchenkov resigned from position a day after the World Anti-Doping Agency suspended his lab's accreditation. The WADA-appointed commission that investigated the Russian doping scandal remarked the former director of the Russian anti-doping lab was "at the heart" of the Russian doping conspiracy.

The WADA spokesman added officials of the anti-doping agency watched the 60 Minutes report, that revealed new and very disturbing allegations regarding Russian doping in sport and added we will look into these without delay.

The WADA-appointed independent commission made recommended that resulted in the suspension of the Russian track and field team from international competitions. The commission chair, Dick Pound, wrote there is no reason to believe that athletics is the only sport in Russia to have been affected by the identified systemic failures. In the last few days, many athletes from many countries have called for expanding the investigation beyond track and field.

Travis Tygart, the CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, remarked the latest news is a clear call for WADA to embrace the athletes' demands for a broader investigation. Tygart called the new revelations in the 60 Minutes story about cheating in Sochi clearly, the final nail in the coffin for Russian track and field. Tygart added there is not enough time for Russia to prove it is clean. The CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency they continue to attack the truth-tellers, denying the depth of the problem. Tygart said there has been no effective testing for months, no meaningful consequences. It just simply can't be done and also commented it is not fair to clean athletes.


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