WADA Very Alarmed By Widespread Cheating Claims In Athletics

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) remarked on Sunday that it was "very alarmed" by reports of widespread doping in major competitions including the Olympic Games and world championships by track and field athletes.

International Association of Athletic Federations

WADA President Craig Reedie said in a statement on the official website that the World Anti-Doping Agency is very disturbed by these new allegations that have been raised by ARD, which will, once again, shake the foundation of clean athletes worldwide. Reedie added given the nature of these allegations, which are an extension to those that were raised by ARD's December 2014 documentary, they will immediately be handed over to WADA's Independent Commission for further investigation.

WADA made this remark after allegations appeared in the Sunday Times and aired in a documentary by German broadcaster ARD. The allegations claimed a third of medals awarded in these global competitions between 2001 and the 2012 London Olympics were won by athletes who recorded suspicious doping tests. The Sunday Times and ARD based their reports on a leaked database that was held by the International Association of Athletic Federations (IAAF) that holds the results of 12,000 blood tests on 5,000 athletes.

The blood tests were scrutinized by Australian doping experts Michael Ashenden and Robin Parisotto. The anti-doping experts concluded that 800 athletes, belonging to a range of disciplines, had produced "suspicious" results. According to allegations, nearly 150 medalists, including 55 gold medal winners had suspicious doping tests. It was claimed that no action has been taken against these "doper" athletes.  Robin Parisotto remarked that he has never seen such an alarmingly abnormal set of blood values.

The IAAF in response to the newly-surfaced allegations said the relevant allegations were broadcast on WDR (ARD) in Germany and have been repeated in an article in the Sunday Times newspaper. The world governing body of athletics also said they are largely based on analysis of an IAAF data base of private and confidential medical data which has been obtained without consent and the IAAF statement also revealed the IAAF will reserve the right to take any follow up action necessary to protect the rights of the IAAF and its athletes.

In December 2014, a previous ARD documentary that was televised had placed the focus on the Russian track and field program. This documentary also emphasized on claims of systematic doping and ineffective scrutiny by the International Association of Athletic Federations. In response to this documentary, an Independent Commission, chaired by its founding president Dick Pound, was set up for investigating allegations about the Russian program. This ARD documentary implicated coaches, athletes, and the IAAF-accredited testing laboratory based in Moscow.

The new allegations claim athletes have been making use of blood transfusions and very low dosages of Erythropoietin (EPO). It was further claimed that as much as 80 percent of Russia's medal haul between 2001 and 2012 was claimed by athletes whose test results were cause for concern. It was also claimed in the new documentary that Kenya had 18 medals won by suspicious athletes.

Tags:

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.