Please Scroll Down to See Forums Below
napsgear
genezapharmateuticals
domestic-supply
puritysourcelabs
Research Chemical SciencesUGFREAKeudomestic
napsgeargenezapharmateuticals domestic-supplypuritysourcelabsResearch Chemical SciencesUGFREAKeudomestic

Veteran Thread The Importance of Rest and Recovery for Injury Prevention and Development of Lean Mass

Veteran Discussion

Supertiredwantfood

Staff
Female Moderator
EVO Logger
Strong Woman
Back at it with another informative thread for you all! The purpose of this is to provide information on why is it important to prioritize recovery, mobility, rest days, warming up and cooling down - as well as how to do so. I have developed two complete examples of how to implement this on both training days and non-training days on pdf available to download/copy for your use.

Warming up:
As we should all know, warming up is incredibly important to reduce the risk of injury during training. Warming up can and should be done in multiple ways - pre-training (3-5 mins minimum dynamic stretching, followed by 3-5 mins minimum jogging/running/stair-climber/skipping etc.) and during training (minimum 1 warm up set for each mew muscle group used). This may seem tedious, however if you were to feature all forms of warm ups listed for the minimum amount, it would only add an additional 6-10 mins to your session. The benefits of warming up far out-weigh the time it takes to do so. A complete example of a warm up is featured in the below PDF or image under "training day example"

Cooling down:

This is a very underappreciated safety measure post-training - cooling down is necessary to slowly return out bodies to their resting state after training. Cooling down should be done similarly to warming up - 3-5 mins minimum jogging/running/stair-climber/skipping etc. followed by 3-5 mins minimum static stretching. Cooling down prevents blood pooling from occurring as well as reducing likelihood of sudden fainting, nausea, and dizziness. Cooling down is even more necessary for individuals who are sensitive to sudden changes in their bodies (those with certain health conditions, the elderly etc.) A complete example of a cooling down is featured in the below PDF or image under "training day example"

Mobility:
Joint mobility exercises are incredibly important to feature in your program to ensure you are able to reach full range of motion during training. Many people struggle to reach depth/full ROM on certain exercises due to poor ankle, hip and shoulder mobility to name a few. As we all know, reaching depth/full ROM is necessary for gains! Mobility exercises will also assist with injury prevention as they often help with flexibility of muscles, and increased mobility = less strain during training and daily movement. A complete example of mobility exercises are featured in the below PDF or image under "rest day example"

Recovery:
Foam rolling and the use of massage balls post-training can help reduce delayed-onset-muscle-soreness and decreases recovery time of the trained muscle - meaning this can assist with muscle growth! Using a foam roller and/or massage ball on sore or stiff muscles pre-training will likely reduce soreness and help to increase general mobility and ROM, which makes for increased performance. A complete example of recovery exercises are featured in the below PDF or image under "rest day example"

Rest days:
Rest days are important for the development of lean mass and strength and must be prioritized in your program. I would recommend taking active rest days as they will better improve muscle soreness and stiffness after training, helping to increase mobility, flexibility and range of motion. On an active rest day, you can include mobility and recovery exercises as well as some form of aerobic activity. Static and dynamic stretching may even be included if you're feeling particularly motivated. Ensure minimum 1 rest day per week is taken for both the physical benefits and to avoid burnout.

Mobility vs flexibility:
Flexibility = The ability of a muscle or muscle groups to lengthen passively through a range of motion (e.g can't touch toes due to poor hamstring flexibility)
Mobility = The ability of a joint to move actively through a range of motion (e.g can't reach full ROM on squats due to poor ankle mobility)

Static vs dynamic stretching:
Dynamic stretching = Stretching with movement (e.g leg swings)
Static stretching = Stretching with a hold/no movement (e.g standing quadricep stretch)

PNF stretching:
PNF stretching is an amazing technique that can be used with basically all major muscle groups (e.g lying hamstring stretch, standing quadricep stretch, shoulder stretch). PNF stretching can be done in multiple ways and I will provide a link to an article on PNF stretching and strategies to be used. PNF stretching can be done alone, however it helps to have someone there to help apply resistance.

Here is a direct quote from the article: https://stretchcoach.com/articles/pnf-stretching/
The process of performing a PNF stretch involves the following.
1) The muscle group to be stretched is positioned so that the muscles are stretched and under tension.
2) The individual then contracts the stretched muscle group for 5 – 6 seconds while a partner, or immovable object, applies sufficient resistance to inhibit movement. Please note; the effort of contraction should be relevant to the level of conditioning and the muscle group you’re targeting (see “PNF Precautions!” above).
3) The contracted muscle group is then relaxed and a controlled stretch is applied for about 20 to 30 seconds. The muscle group is then allowed 30 seconds to recover and the process is repeated 2 – 4 times.


How to structure all into your program/examples: (pdf below images)

Screenshot_20240109_140413_Drive.jpg
Screenshot_20240109_140421_Drive.jpg
 

Attachments

  • Rest day example.pdf
    47.5 KB · Views: 24
  • Training day example.pdf
    44 KB · Views: 32
Back at it with another informative thread for you all! The purpose of this is to provide information on why is it important to prioritize recovery, mobility, rest days, warming up and cooling down - as well as how to do so. I have developed two complete examples of how to implement this on both training days and non-training days on pdf available to download/copy for your use.

Warming up:
As we should all know, warming up is incredibly important to reduce the risk of injury during training. Warming up can and should be done in multiple ways - pre-training (3-5 mins minimum dynamic stretching, followed by 3-5 mins minimum jogging/running/stair-climber/skipping etc.) and during training (minimum 1 warm up set for each mew muscle group used). This may seem tedious, however if you were to feature all forms of warm ups listed for the minimum amount, it would only add an additional 6-10 mins to your session. The benefits of warming up far out-weigh the time it takes to do so. A complete example of a warm up is featured in the below PDF or image under "training day example"

Cooling down:
This is a very underappreciated safety measure post-training - cooling down is necessary to slowly return out bodies to their resting state after training. Cooling down should be done similarly to warming up - 3-5 mins minimum jogging/running/stair-climber/skipping etc. followed by 3-5 mins minimum static stretching. Cooling down prevents blood pooling from occurring as well as reducing likelihood of sudden fainting, nausea, and dizziness. Cooling down is even more necessary for individuals who are sensitive to sudden changes in their bodies (those with certain health conditions, the elderly etc.) A complete example of a cooling down is featured in the below PDF or image under "training day example"

Mobility:
Joint mobility exercises are incredibly important to feature in your program to ensure you are able to reach full range of motion during training. Many people struggle to reach depth/full ROM on certain exercises due to poor ankle, hip and shoulder mobility to name a few. As we all know, reaching depth/full ROM is necessary for gains! Mobility exercises will also assist with injury prevention as they often help with flexibility of muscles, and increased mobility = less strain during training and daily movement. A complete example of mobility exercises are featured in the below PDF or image under "rest day example"

Recovery:
Foam rolling and the use of massage balls post-training can help reduce delayed-onset-muscle-soreness and decreases recovery time of the trained muscle - meaning this can assist with muscle growth! Using a foam roller and/or massage ball on sore or stiff muscles pre-training will likely reduce soreness and help to increase general mobility and ROM, which makes for increased performance. A complete example of recovery exercises are featured in the below PDF or image under "rest day example"

Rest days:
Rest days are important for the development of lean mass and strength and must be prioritized in your program. I would recommend taking active rest days as they will better improve muscle soreness and stiffness after training, helping to increase mobility, flexibility and range of motion. On an active rest day, you can include mobility and recovery exercises as well as some form of aerobic activity. Static and dynamic stretching may even be included if you're feeling particularly motivated. Ensure minimum 1 rest day per week is taken for both the physical benefits and to avoid burnout.

Mobility vs flexibility:
Flexibility = The ability of a muscle or muscle groups to lengthen passively through a range of motion (e.g can't touch toes due to poor hamstring flexibility)
Mobility = The ability of a joint to move actively through a range of motion (e.g can't reach full ROM on squats due to poor ankle mobility)

Static vs dynamic stretching:
Dynamic stretching = Stretching with movement (e.g leg swings)
Static stretching = Stretching with a hold/no movement (e.g standing quadricep stretch)

PNF stretching:
PNF stretching is an amazing technique that can be used with basically all major muscle groups (e.g lying hamstring stretch, standing quadricep stretch, shoulder stretch). PNF stretching can be done in multiple ways and I will provide a link to an article on PNF stretching and strategies to be used. PNF stretching can be done alone, however it helps to have someone there to help apply resistance.

Here is a direct quote from the article: https://stretchcoach.com/articles/pnf-stretching/
The process of performing a PNF stretch involves the following.
1) The muscle group to be stretched is positioned so that the muscles are stretched and under tension.
2) The individual then contracts the stretched muscle group for 5 – 6 seconds while a partner, or immovable object, applies sufficient resistance to inhibit movement. Please note; the effort of contraction should be relevant to the level of conditioning and the muscle group you’re targeting (see “PNF Precautions!” above).
3) The contracted muscle group is then relaxed and a controlled stretch is applied for about 20 to 30 seconds. The muscle group is then allowed 30 seconds to recover and the process is repeated 2 – 4 times.


How to structure all into your program/examples: (pdf below images)

View attachment 20163View attachment 20164
@Supertiredwantfood well put and I think many guys and gals dont understand you grow when you REST not when you train
 
If you aren't staying flexible and keeping your joints mobile then expect injuries I can guarantee it as you get older and if you're adding steroids to the mix the injury risk is a hundred percent
 
it's very important to warm up and stretch post workout
otherwise your injury risk goes up a lot
 
LOG APPROVED - PLEASE POST A LOG

This thread/post was reviewed by our Medical Review board.

This thread/post/message was also fact checked by Steven Darwin, MD and our medical review board.

Full editorial process was followed, and please read our medical disclaimer, check our editorial process.
 
warming up is very underrated because people are in a rush when they work out
sometimes they have to wait for a machine and people don't want to wait behind them so they get rushed
 
I recommend warming up away from the actual machine you're going to use
so if you're going to bench press then warm up maybe doing some light weight on a machine that pushes
 
You are gonna hate me for this but I don't do either ever 🙈
bruz you better start now or i'll send u a bullet in the mail 😂 fr though it's important i don't want to see a log update from you letting us all know you've been injured!
 
bruz you better start now or i'll send u a bullet in the mail 😂 fr though it's important i don't want to see a log update from you letting us all know you've been injured!
Yeah a bullet huh, well I'm best friends with Crocodile Dundee good luck he eats bullets for breakfast 😁 yeah I know I know especially when I start my cycle 🙈
 
3-4 days lifting max for me.
just depends on training style imo - if you're training at high intensity/doing maximal lifts for sure 6 days would be suicide and 3-4 is likely enough but for general hypertrophy training 5 days is great and depending on the person and if they're on gear they can get away with 6 for sure.
 
just depends on training style imo - if you're training at high intensity/doing maximal lifts for sure 6 days would be suicide and 3-4 is likely enough but for general hypertrophy training 5 days is great and depending on the person and if they're on gear they can get away with 6 for sure.
3-4 days per week while on gear is pushing it for me. 6 days per week on gear is for the majority on here overtraining. U have to be doing everything perfect to be able to get away with 5 days per week. And I don’t even train maximal intensity every workout. It takes longer than a week to recover from some of my workouts.
 
Back
Top Bottom